Thoughts on Fishing Shoreline Lay-downs

Spread the love

Most bass anglers search the shoreline regions of the waterway being fished for prime surface cover potentially harboring the biggest bass in an area…

fishing fallen trees

I get very excited each time I find a tree that has crashed from its former place on the bank sending the trunk and radiating array of branches into the depths creating a myriad of bass-holding ambush points beneath the surface!

Recently I came across a video from a well-known bass fishing celebrity, Bill Dance offering his approach for fishing fallen trees he finds in his favorite honey-holes. Take a moment and watch this short video from BD and hear what he has to say…

Like he says, in our excitement to get hooked up quickly, we often fire our baits into the heart of the lay-down and probably miss many more bass catching opportunities around the outer edges and unseen deeper branches…

Here are several more of my suggestions for the next time you are approaching a fallen tree and getting ready to fire your first cast at all those tantalizing targets:

  • Before ever firing a cast deep into the array of branches or into the trunk, take a few moments and probe the outer ends of the branches along the length of the trunk and across the top (outer-most portion) of the tree for active, cruising bass…
  • Each fallen tree you encounter is different since the type of tree and its age will influence the density of the branch network under the surface and will require a unique plan to fish them effectively…
  • Make multiple casts to each spot along the lay-down since bass in the heart of the cover are often less active and often need to be aggravated into striking…
  • Probe each part of the lay-down with baits allowing you to contact the trunk or branch while not getting hung up since attempts to recover the bait may shut down the whole tree for a period of time…
  • Use a variety of baits when exploring each spot and consider using types that work the surface (topwaters, buzzbaits, frogs); mid-depths (squarebills, spinnerbaits, chatterbaits) & the bottom (weedless rigged soft plastics, jigs) to better your chance of triggering a strike…
  • Make note of secondary types of cover (matter weeds, weedbeds growing within the lay-down or rocks on the bottom under the lay-down) and adjust your presentations to work these targets as well…

Remember, taking more time to consider your approach to fishing a lay-down and then following through with a plan may well help you catch more and bigger bass this season!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

What is 15 + 7 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve the following simple math (so we know that you are a human) :-)